Travel Advice for Senegal
Senegal
Capital: Dakar

Time Zone GMT
Telephone
Services
Country Code: 221
IDD: International Direct Dialling is available
Outgoing Code: 00
Emergency
Telephone
Numbers
8237 392 (Embassy)
Tourist
Information
Ministry of Tourism and The Environment, BP 4049, 23 rue Calmette, Dakar, Senegal Tel: 821 1240 Fax: 822 9413.
Passport
Information
Valid passport required. Return Ticket Required. Requirements may be subject to change at short notice. Contact the embassy before departure.
Visa
Information
Required by all except nationals of Great Britain, Canada, USA, Algeria, Benin, Burkina Faso, Cape Verde, Central African Republic, Congo, Cote d'Ivoire, Gabon, Gambia, Ghana, Guinea, Guinea Bissau, Liberia, Mali, Mauritania, Mauritius, Morocco, Niger, Nigeria, Rwanda, Sierra Leone, Togo and Tunisia.
Health
Information
Polio, Typhoid: Vaccination recommended.
Malaria : Exists throughout the country in Falciparum variety. Resistance to chloroquine has been reported.
Yellow Fever: A vaccination certificate is required by travellers arriving from endemic areas.
Other Health Risks: Bilharzia, Cholera, Meningitis, Rabies.
Food
& Drink
Water is untreated and not safe to drink. Avoid dairy products as they are not pasteurised. Fruit and vegetables should be peeled before consumption.
Currency CFA Franc (CFA Fr) = 100 centimes.
Amex and MasterCard are accepted, but other credit cards are not. Travellers cheques, preferably in French francs, are accepted.
ATM availability: 9 locations.
Cost of
Living
Accommodation is expensive, especially in the capital city and surrounding areas.
Languages French, Many local languages are also spoken.
Weather Dry season = Dec - May. Rainy season = June - Nov.
Electricity 220 Volts AC 50 Hz.
Post 7 - 10 days to Europe.
Transport ROADS: many are impassable during the rainy season. There are frequent check points and speed restrictions are strict.
DOCUMENTATION: IDP is required. Many roads in the Casamance region are mined.
Special
Information
Avoid travel to the Casamance region. It is polite to pay respect to the headman or school-teacher of any village you visit. Tipping is not always deemed courteous. Muggings are increasing in cities and major towns.